dancers, activists, and change makers share the why behind their work. 

 

An Interview with Camille A. Brown

When I talk about enslaved Africans and how they used social dance to resist or to combat
oppression, that’s a form of social justice.

Taking agency over your body is a form of social
justice.
— Camille A. Brown
 
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AN INTERVIEW WITH CHLOE CHOTRANI

Right now, it’s essential to be more vocal. As artists, as activists, as people - as citizens in general - we have a responsibility to be aware and be proactive.

Movement, dance, and the arts are a powerful medium. They cross through
sensations, cultures and language.
— Chloe Chotrani
 

AN INTERVIEW WITH MELANIE BUTTARAZZI

When I created Fostering Dreams, I knew that the program wouldn’t just be teaching dance, making people happy and then leaving. I wanted to connect. I want students to feel safe, loved, and have a sense of belonging. Even if they don’t feel that outside of the dance class, they have something to look forward to in the class.
— Melanie Buttarazzi, Founder of Fostering Dreams Project
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SHAWN LENT’S GUIDE TO RESOURCES FOR SOCIALLY ENGAGED ARTISTS

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Shawn Lent is a social practice dance artist and the founder of Dance Peace Chicago, bringing movement and opportunities for collaboration and peace building to refugee youth in communities across the city. She is also the author of the viral essay, Am I a Dancer Who Gave Up?

 
 

DANCE AND TRAUMA IN HUMANITARIAN SETTINGS.

An interview with Dance Movement Therapist and founder of Restorative Resources, Amber Elizabeth Gray.

DANCE, HUMAN RIGHTS, AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

An interview with Director of Programs at the Philadelphia Folklore Project, dance scholar and author, Toni Shapiro-Phim.

DANCE AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP

An interview with Design Dance Founder, Debra Ginuta.

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Dignity is one of the most basic human rights and I think the roots of dignity are in our right to embody.
— - Amber Elizabeth Gray
Social activists have long appreciated dance’s potency as a source of social change, and I think that synergy has gotten stronger over the years.
— Toni Shapiro-Phim
Art is the first thing people cut. If a school can’t afford to keep their core teachers on, it’s harder for them to justify the arts. It’s fighting for something that feels, to many people, like a superfluous need.
— Debra Ginuta